Sterling has too many projects Blogging about programming, microcontrollers & electronics, 3D printing, and whatever else...

» Supply Blocks

When you have a stream of data flowing through your Raku application that needs to be accessed safely among threads, you want a Supply. Today we’re going to discuss one particular way of working with supplies, the supply block. If you are familiar with sequences, aka Seq objects, a supply block works in a very similar fashion, but lets you pull work as it arrives and easily do something else in the meantime.
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» Promises

In Raku, Promises represent the simplest of the high-level language features for communicating between asynchronous tasks. They are very much like promises between people. For example, I might promise my son I will help him with his school work. I keep that promise when I help him. Or I break that promise if, for any reason, I fail to help him. The same is true of a Promise in Raku. A Promise to return a value is kept when that value arrives.
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» Introducing Async & Concurrency in Raku

Before we get into the guts of this advent calendar for the next 23 days after today, I want to be sure to introduce the basic concepts I’m going to cover. I am calling this the Raku Async & Concurrency Advent Calendar, but what do those terms mean and how do they apply to Raku? This advent calendar assumes a basic knowledge of Raku. If you don’t know Raku, but you are familiar with another language, I’m sure you will probably be able to follow along.
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» Sterling's 2019 Raku Async & Concurrency Advent Calendar

I have never done a full advent calendar before. I have contributed to some other calendar blogs in the past, but this will be the first time I do a complete one of my own. This is my announcement: I am doing an advent calendar. It’s even mostly written already. So what’s the theme? Raku! Concurrency! Async! Parallelism! All that stuff is my focus. I’ve spent some extra hours here and there trying to better understand the concurrency and async programming features of Raku and I’m going to share my knowledge with anyone who is interested.
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» Quickly: Using a sub as a method

Quickly now, let’s consider the difference between a sub and a method. When programming Perl 6, the only significant difference between a sub and a method is that a method always takes at least one positional argument whereas a sub only takes what’s listed in the parameter list. In a method, the required first positional parameter is not passed as part of the parameter list, but assigned to self. For example,
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» What does the export trait actually do?

I started this post as a rehash of Modules with some additional details. However, as I started running my examples, I found out that while the documentation on modules is good, it does not tell the full story regarding exports. As I do not want to write a manifesto on module exports, I’m going to assume you already read the above document and understand Perl 6 exports. If not, go read it and I’ll wait for you to return.
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» Monitoring WordPress with Prometheus in Kubernetes

A year (or probably two now), I converted all of my personal services into a Kubernetes cluster. We’ve been moving toward Kubernetes at work and so I wanted to know how it worked from the inside by building a cluster myself. Part of that hosting work includes hosting a site for the homeschool coop my wife leads, a web site for a weekly “geek lunch”, and also hosting our city mayor’s campaign web site.
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» Using Build.pm for complex Perl 6 builds

I am working on a robotics project with my 3 boys. For this project, I have designed the core components to be a Raspberry Pi, an Adafruit Circuit Playground Express (CPX), and an Adafruit Crickit Hat. The Raspberry Pi will be running firmware written by me to control the Crickit Hat. This firmware will directly drive the sensors, the motors, the servo, and other hardware. The Raspberry Pi also communicates over USB to the CPX to provide high level sensor information and receive commands.
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» Multi-stage Docker builds are your friend

For my first real post of my new blog, let’s talk about multi-stage docker builds. This blog is built with the aid of just such a build. A multi-stage docker build gives you the ability to build multiple containers. In the case of my build, it helps me build a single end-product that’s uncluttered by extra build configuration and tooling. Why multi-stage? Docker holds a place in the modern development pipeline for deployed applications similar to the role the classic Makefile has in building packaged applications.
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» First Post

So here’s the story. For most of my adult life I have had a blog of some kind. I like to write. It’s a great way to blow off steam. I also like to brag about things I’m doing or learning about. It’s a pride issue, but I like to think I do interesting things others would be interested in too. My last blog atrophied as such things do. My posts had gotten short enough to be in Facebook post range, so I’ve been doing just that then.
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